Archive for Writing Tips

Client Success: Dr. Linda Craighead Supports Kids and Parents Through Childhood Obesity

Illustration by Robbie Short

“Writing and sharing this book has been very rewarding as I’m giving many more people a resource than I could by seeing them individually,” said Linda W. Craighead, Ph.D, licensed clinical psychologist and professor at Emory University.

Through simple concepts and energetic illustrations supporting both kids and parents, her book Training Your Inner Pup To Eat Well helps kids understand why their parents are concerned about their weight and empowers them to take ownership of their eating so it isn’t a source of tension at home with parents seen as the “food police.”

“I got the idea from working with a 12-year old boy who already weighed 222 pounds and had significant health problems related to obesity.  He and his family volunteered to be on The Dr. Oz Show in 2010 to draw attention to the increasing problem of child obesity. The show invited me as an obesity expert and asked me to follow up with the family to provide treatment.”

Through her clinical work with adults, Dr. Craighead had developed an approach called Appetite Awareness Training which is available as a self-help book, The Appetite Awareness Workbook: How to Listen to Your Body and Overcome Bingeing, Overeating, and Obsession with Food.  She modified it for relevance and appeal to children/adolescents, and this resulted in Training Your Inner Pup to Eat Well.  Through the process, she benefited from contributions from clients, grad students, and other therapists, particularly a group leading an obesity clinic in Iceland that first integrated the concept and shared their results.

“I started using the main metaphor of a dog after working with the 12-year old boy and his family for over a year. Then I trained other therapists to use the metaphor. Over time I wanted images for the concepts, and while searching the internet, I was lucky to find illustrator Robbie Short in Atlanta whose style was particularly appealing, not too young but with a sense of humor. He created the images, and the response from kids and parents was positive. This was something that all parents seemed to relate to. So, I wanted to make something available for any parent wanting guidance on positive ways to teach children healthy eating in what I call the ‘food-rich environment.’

“Although I had written a textbook, the adult self-help book, and multiple journal articles,” Dr. Craighead said, “I didn’t enjoy writing this at first as I didn’t feel like I was doing a good job writing for kids. I was surprised at how different it needed to be from all I had written before. I was again lucky to be referred to Wayne South Smith by a fellow psychologist who had benefited from his guidance.

“The most fun was getting Wayne’s comments and having that a-ha moment when he suggested a phrase or a word that was just right or sparked another idea in me. I don’t know that I would have kept up the effort without having someone to check in and give feedback and guidance. I had a lot to learn about ‘point of view,’ as well as making the writing conversational and appealing to kids.

“The lesson I learned from this experience was to ask for help when I felt stuck in a writing project and that using a professional doesn’t have to be a huge investment. They totally changed how I approached the book. I am so grateful I found Wayne and Robbie as they made this project a reality.”

Client Success: Joe Shumock’s Thriller Combines Human Cloning and Long Lost Love

“I enjoy writing stories a little out of the ordinary,” said Joe Shumock, author of the new thriller Sacrifice of the Lambs.  “I’d been considering a book broaching the concept of human cloning for several years.”

The fourth novel in his Letter Series involves returning character and retired CIA operative, Rage Doyle, who travels from his East Tennessee mountain home to Prague, summoned by a flame from his 20s upon her plea to investigate suspicious deaths of a friend and her daughter. Ensnared in both a sinister situation thirty years in the making and a rekindled love affair, Doyle uses the strength of a man half his age alongside seasoned know-how to face life-and-death deadlines, heart-wrenching discoveries, and a conspiracy to implicate him in the crimes he’s attempting to solve.

Shumock, who has been writing and publishing since 2007 after retiring from his CPA firm, smiles when he hears the catchphrase writers write what they know.  “Totally untrue of me and my stories. I have a roaring curiosity and imagination. I love imagining what can be. My characters become real, and I help them get into trouble and sometimes out of it.”

Locations are normally a character in his stories. “I picked Prague in the Czech Republic because medical experimentation was important there, and with the capital’s history and beauty, it became my choice. I began writing before traveling to Europe, and I wrote for my three weeks there.  The city enabled me to make it a part of the story.”

“Then in 2015, I met Wayne at the Decatur Book Festival. Our conversation and some time with other writers in attendance convinced me to reach out for editing help.  Wayne told me what I was doing right. The challenging part for me was the period between having Wayne say my story needed major work in areas, offering ideas, and the point where I realized he was right and I was not.

“My biggest takeaway was to listen and discuss, and then not let my pride make me wrong.  I’ve come a long way toward accepting positive criticism as an additional tool to make my novel the best it can be. I have worked with other editors, and with Wayne on this book, I found the right fit with a healthy respect of each other’s goals and what it would take to attain them.  He’s a man of many talents.”

For writers starting out on their path, Shumock shared, “If you don’t have tenacity, find something else to do. Writing is hard and must be challenged at every turn, especially during revision and editing.  Even with marketing. I’ve heard it before, and I agree: writing the early drafts of the book is the easy part.”

Next up, Shumock is finishing a children’s story, Briana and the Dog, for a spring release, and then he will begin the fifth novel in his Letter Series.  For information on Shumock and his books, visit SilverSageMedia.com or his author page on Amazon.com.

How A Good Editor Works

At a crucial juncture after the climactic scene when the subplot needed attention, his novel went in an unexpected direction.  As his editor, I suggested removing the newly-introduced subplot to naturally steer the protagonist to the crucial needs of the woman he loved, the only issue to be addressed for final resolution.  The author read my notes and heard my rationale, yet remained skeptical.

Weeks later during revisions, we chatted about a software challenge, and he brought up his continued attachment to the new subplot.  I further explained my emotional reaction and logical reasoning.  He stated his case from a different angle, and I could tell that it was not only important to him but also to the future of a brewing sequel.

red.100 - goodI felt an idea rise like a jolt of electricity, flashing up my spine to the top of my head.  I shared the basic premise of how the setup of the subplot could be incorporated earlier.  He responded encouragingly.  I shared the entire brainstorm.  He added his creativity to it, and the issue was suddenly a beautiful turning point, one that solved another plot issue too.

Delighted, we laughed, and then he said, “Maybe I’m naïve, but I’ve got to ask:  Is this the way a normal editor works?”

“In my opinion, yes.  A good one anyway.”

I explained good editors work differently.  After acknowledging my client’s work with editors on his other books—usually without contact beyond rote emails and corrections in the text, many of which were computer-generated—I shared about those who inspired me to do the work I’ve chosen to do.

I remembered when my high school English teacher made me editor of the yearbook.  I said, “But I don’t know how to do that,” and he confirmed, “Sure you do.  You’ll be great!”  And that was that.  I knew I could trust him for guidance.

In addition to new skills, he taught me a good editor has a fearlessness to encourage creativity’s experimentation and bold ideas in collaboration. My teacher recognized and affirmed the good, then build upon it.

Among college professors and editors for print media, corporate communications, and theatrical productions, my greatest mentor was a magazine editor who was clear in direction before I began my work and supportive in the process through revision.  Once she took her turn with my copy as she readied it for print, I was hard pressed to find her changes.

She taught me to build relationship on clear vision to encourage writers and to hone my editorial skills to enhance the writing, elevating both the writer’s voice and the final product’s intended message.

The best editing isn’t a one-way street where some unseen person puts their mark on a writer’s work.  From both editors and clients I’ve worked with, I’ve learned it’s imperative to have a friendly relationship with both the writing and the writer.  Don’t turn the process competitive or argumentative with ego.  The union of writer and editor is collaborative with clear communication, keen listening, and openness to discovery and growth.  Yes, editing is a science in the sense of the rules and formats to follow, but it’s also creative.

To the writer on the phone, I added, “This is how I work.  It works well for me and for many others too.”

He agreed, parting with the promise of a quick return of the revisions and a commitment to begin work on his next book while I edited the current one.

Creative Coaching and Editing

Hocus Focus

In May I did something totally magical: I unplugged. For an entire week.

SGIsland.May.2015.wayne.south.smithI went to a quiet beach with friends and rarely checked my Iphone, which vacationed in my bedroom drawer. For several days, I had stints alone on the beach for big sums of time. After putting up an umbrella, settling into my chair and getting some water from the cooler, I sat and watched the waves.

I breathed deeply as I reminisced on all the editing I’ve completed for writers and myself through the first half of the year. Then I noticed how odd it felt not to have my phone near me, even though it’s silenced for good focus when I work. I pondered the magical world we live in, one where we can simultaneously communicate with various people, use various electronics, surf various platforms, and allow bombardment by a cacophony of various images, sounds, and messages, if we so choose. Yet sitting on that beach, I felt nervous and untethered without possession of my only timepiece.

Soon, those thoughts and worries were out to sea. My mind focused on what was in front of me: the beauty and mystery where I’d yearned to spend time. Thoughts washed ashore and receded back with the undertow. Bliss. Each day when I went inside and checked my phone for the time, I was surprised by how long I’d been basking in relaxation.

Upon my return to Atlanta, I followed my usual strategies. Phone alerts off. I know to do my best work, I must be as present as possible, to not only be in my complete self but to be in my total project to face it fully.

SGIsland.May.2015 110I know writers who don’t, and oftentimes their process and work suffer the consequences. Can you be aware when writing while listening to the radio or TV, eating lunch, and glancing at your phone for texts, emails, tweets, and posts? And here’s one—how can you hear your own thoughts while combining writing with listening to an instructional video on writing?  Writing can require fancy “footwork,” but it isn’t Zumba…

You split your focus and your creative power as you attend to other things—even if randomly and for a flash of time—while trying to write. And since the opportunity to write can be hard to secure, when you find precious time to write, honor it. Recognize your creative time as a divine gift. Treasure and treat it as a blessing. Be grateful for it, make choices with the integrity of your heart, and use it wisely.

Many have proved the ability to do a lot all at once. When you do, you may collect tidbits of awareness and nuggets of wisdom. But imagine what can happen when you focus your efforts into one determined energy, and nurture the writing in front of you? Magic, that’s what.